Here's the thing....

"The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars..."-Jack Kerouac

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Diabetes Article (Blog #12)

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/25/health/25ada.html?ex=1166158800&en=18616e2e9c7c7a2e&ei=5070

I applaud the ADA for making the first step to project a better ethical image. The baby steps are whats most important, and I look forward to seeing what the association does in the future.

However, is it really enough? And what about the phrmaceutical companies?

" Others remain concerned about the A.D.A.’s relationships with pharmaceutical companies. Their presence is evident throughout the charity, from its annual convention, which is largely underwritten by drug makers, to its board meetings, where pharmaceutical executives have served on the volunteer committees that set policy.

The A.D.A. says its independence is evident because it has often acted against the interests of the pharmaceutical industry. Last month, for example, a panel it appointed to study how to treat people at heightened risk of developing diabetes decided against recommending the use of higher-priced brand-name drugs."

Big freakin' deal- one thing happens that they oppose, and suddenly they are completely independent of pharmaceutical companies? That's quite lame and not something that they should be claiming. For an association that regulates the food and drug administration, the ethical value would be to to not accept any money at all from something that could be swayed. To me, it looks very shady and unethical- who knows what money is being slid under the table for the association to be approving the drugs? This is not something that should be messed with- these are the drugs that people are buying everyday, and just because large companies give a ton of money does not mean they should get special treatment. Also, who says that its right for someone who works for a drug company to serve on a volunteer board that sets "policy" of all things? That is not ethical because the company is going to want to make the policy reflect positively on their drugs, to make it easier for them to be approved. We live in a money driven society,and something MUST be changed for it to start to turn. If not, we will be turning a corner for the worse- and thats scary.

1 Comments:

At 12:44 PM, Blogger jacqueline said...

Hmmmm, I hadn't thought about it, Lauren, but LAF and LAF--your initials and your case study.

Nice postings on a lot of topics--and I agree that the ADA's actions so far are encouraging. At least the topic is on its radar screen. A lot of students have written about their religious faith, which is something that I haven't had the opportunity to discuss in class before, but I'm glad our textbook Cosmopolitanism gave us the opportunity to explore that area, since it's such an important topic in politics, international relations, and in other areas of public life. We need to learn to discuss it in public spaces, I guess, to help us interact across boundaries. Take care and best,

 

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